How Is Your Sales Team Celebrating Success?

How Is Your Sales Team Celebrating Success?

By Mark Landiak

August 12, 2015 – It's mere moments before your weekly sales meeting. The typical small talk and chatter fills the air as your team starts filing into the room from the sales floor. Everyone seems upbeat and lively, and with good reason. Last week was a great week. Two of your wireless sales reps set new highs for activations, your store accessory sales beat their forecasts, and your rookie sales rep (who you were admittedly a little worried about at this time a month ago) is forming some good habits and showing some real improvement. There's a wildly contagious positive vibe running through your team right now. Things are looking up, and everyone can sense it.

As a wireless sales manager, how you celebrate success is pivotal to creating a winning culture. For those who are accustomed to success, winning can (and often does) feel habitual. When success and winning becomes consistent, it starts to become the expectation. Success can actually become challenging though when managing those who are not familiar with it. For those experiencing success for the first time, their first concern will be learning to "ride the wave." They want to understand how to maintain that success or (depending on their frame) avoid doing anything to mess it up. They want to cultivate successful habits. Managing your wireless sales team through the highs is just as important as managing them through the lows.

Know Your Customer Identity

Know Your Customer Identity

By Mark LandiakMichael Janowski

August 5, 2015 – Wireless customers can go years with the same service provider and not consider switching. They might be tempted with a cheaper rate plan or an upgraded device. But brand loyalty runs strong when properly cultivated.

Consider this: With saturation in the marketplace, the focus in wireless has to shift from acquisition to customer retention. Due to the availability of group/family plans and the growth of younger generations using mobile technology, there are entire families that are beginning to usher their children and grandchildren into the care of their own wireless service provider. Wireless service providers are beginning to assume a unique new position among the family unit. That position is characterized by a loyalty, understanding, and trust. But in the future, it may also carry meanings of tradition. It may not be all that uncommon to one day hear someone utter something akin to the phrase, “We've been a (insert your wireless provider) family for years now. It's our family's wireless company.”